[identity profile] kippurbird.livejournal.com
Anita Blake Drinking Game

Take a drink every time...

*she has sex (shush)
*someone is jealous of her
*the eyes are described in ridiculous Sue Terms.
*Richard objects to something and Anita shoots him down.
*a male is described in horrible 1980s clothes.
*one of Anita's special powers is mentioned.
*someone mentions the term "lion king."
*the phrase "tight" or "wet" shows up.
*long hair is mentioned on males. Two if it's Nathaniel.
*the word "ardeur" or "arduer" appears
*Anita mentions how much she loves oral sex.
*she mentions her homophobia.
*Jean-Claude infodumps
*Jean-Claude somehow manages to pull off that look
*Ruffles are mentioned on Jean-Claude
*someone changes from human to animal form
*she focuses on the size of a guy's cock
*someone calls her The Executioner
*Richard threatens to kill Jean-Claude
*there's bondage.
*Anita acts like a dominatrix but says she's not into it.
*she shags more than one man at once (one drink for each participant over two).
*the plot makes absolutely no sense.
*you could swear a male character acts like a flaming gay, but they STILL want Anita.
*a female character is made to look bad in comparison to Anita
* Excessive description of what someone is wearing.
*the word "metaphysical" appears.
\~/ Right then. Drinks at the ready?


And what goes after the liver? )
[identity profile] kippurbird.livejournal.com
First off: The amended drinking game list:

Take a drink every time:
* A name has a "cute" meaning.
* Someone does something idiotic.
* A character begins a rambling monologue.
* Two if the monologue is just repeating information we already have.
* One more every time he shows his own agenda when it comes to religion.
* Something happens, but you're not told what.
* He gets something utterly wrong.
* He turns a generalization into an absolute, but you can think of exceptions.
* The truth is precisely the opposite (make it a double).
* Any time a "secret agenda", "hidden agenda", or similar phrasing is mentioned
* The plot hinges on the exact wording of a translation of the original text.
* He mentions the Knights Templar, Masons or any other organization rumored to be the secret rulers of the world.
* A drink every time the words "secret" and "Vatican" are seen together
* Any time he gets all goddess/female power-happy.
* Any time that Langdon has an epiphany.
* And whenever a villain does something Stereotypically Evil (killing off his henchman who Knows Too Much, etc.).
* Any time Langdon has a flashback that shows How Totally Awesome his class is.
* Any time the novel becomes just plain boring
* Any time Brown appears to be writing one-handed.
* Any time that somebody comes up with an obviously cliche excuse and everyone buys it.
* Any time the villain angsts about Needing To Tell The Truth To All.
- Any time the hero does the same, make it a double.
- And a triple if they later decide NOT To Tell The Truth To All.

Right. Everyone got their cups? \_/ Good!



So, Langdon and Sophie...interesting here but the Hero is always referred to by his last name and the girl sidekick by her first name. Obviously the Goddess power doesn't extend to his actual leading lady who gets treated the pretty girl with tits. She's definitely not Langdon's equal, even if Brown is trying to make her one. He says that she's smart (though we don't know why... I mean she's acted like a complete and utter idiot so far) but he's always derogatory towards her. One would think that since a main theme in this book is Women Power that she would be portrayed in a better light. I think that's a drink. \~/ So, after this digression, the two of them sneak, sneak, sneak out into the Grand Gallery, Langdon trying to figure out what's going on. For some reason he suggests that maybe Fache wrote the message on the floor. Which is then obviously discounted as Sophie goes over the reasons why it couldn't have been, recounting why it was for her. \~/

They discuss about maybe the numbers do mean something and Sophie says that the numbers were her grandfather's way of flagging her attention. Just like the Pentacle. Apparently they used to play Tarot cards for fun and her indicator was always the Pentacle.

Langdon felt a chill. They played Tarot? The medieval Italian card game was so replete with hidden heretical symbolism that Langdon had dedicated an entire chapter in his new manuscript to the Tarot. The game's twenty two cards bore names like The Female Pope, The Empressand the Star> Originally, Tarot had been devised as a secret means to pass along ideologies banned by the Church. Now, Tarot's mystical qualities were passed on by modern fortune-tellers

The Tarot indicator suit for feminine divinity is pentacles, Langdon thought, realizing that if Sauniere had been stacking his granddaughter's deck for fun, pentacles was an apropos inside joke.


I checked wikipedia. The Tarot decks did not start in Italy. It is not replete with hidden Heretical symbolism and it was not devised as a secret means to pass along banned ideologies. The female pope however is the Priestess card. And the pentacle is the sign for earth not female divinity. \~/ \~/ \~/ \~/ However, Brown seems to be intent on turning every little thing into some sort of symbol towards the church banning female things and forcing people to hide it everywhere.

Robert and Sophie get to the stairwell and start heading down, with no interruption from guards or anything. As they do we get into a discussion about the number PHI, which Sophie says her grandfather used to joke she was half divine. soPHIe \~/

We then get a ramble about PHI in a flashback in Robert's class. \~/ where we learn about how PHI is everywhere. And then where the Pentacle is a symbol of the sacred feminine. Because it's a PHI which is the most beautiful number and the sacred feminine is beautiful.

When he comes out of his flash back, Robert has an epiphany \~/ about the Limerick. Apparently it's a very simple code; an anagram. O, Draconian Devil! Oh, Lame Saint! becomes Leonardo da Vinci! The Mona Lisa! Which is all well and good, but I don't see how he figured it out. He tells us that the sequence is the clue, but he doesn't tell us how it works with the letters. I would love to know how the code was figured out and what numbers correspond to what letters and now. I'm not a math wiz and this is something I would dearly love to know. \~/ Withholding information, another drink.

This discovered, Sophie suddenly remembers that her grandfather loved anagrams. He turned "Les Demoiselles d'Avignon" into "vile meaningless doodles" for example and he had her do them all the time. Obviously, this means a trip to the Mona Lisa, which is off the Grand Galley and near where they found him. She knows she should get Langdon out of the museum (since she turned him into a fugitive and everything) but after a flashback to where Sophie sees the Mona Lisa for the first time, she decides to go see if her grandfather left her a message.

Langdon is very WTF! What about me being a fugitive and all? And she's all... riiiiight. Here, take my car keys and flee by yourself. Langdon is Okay but only if you stop calling me Mr. Langdon. Awwwww... the Perky Tits have over come his common sense.

So, Langdon goes off on his merry way... and has another epiphany.

With an unexpected jolt, Langdon stop short. Eyes wide, he dug into his pocke and yanked out the computer printout. He stared at the last line of Sauniere's message.

P.S. Find Robert Langdon

He fixated on two letters.

P.S.

In that instant, Langdon felt Sauniere's puzzling mix of symbolism fall into stark focus. Like a peal of thunder, a career's wroth of symbology and history came crashing down around him. Everything Jacques Sauniere had done tonight suddenly made perfect sense.

Langdon's thoughts raced as he tried to assemble the implications of what this all meant. Wheeling, he started back in the direction from which he had come.

Is there time?

He knew it didn't matter.

Without hesitation, Langdon broke into a sprint back toward the stairs.


So... something mysterious just happened with the letters P.S. What is it?! What does it mean?! Why does Langdon have to get back to Sophie in time... in time for what? What is there to be rushing about? They're in an empty museum having cleverly tricked everyone into leaving. Well, since Grandpa is such a fan of anagrams let's say "P.S." stands for Stupid People. So, it would be "Stupid People find Robert Langdon". No wonder he's upset. Sophie wasn't supposed to find him at all.

Well, now he's off to tell her the truth and we'll see what happens. Oh, and that's two more \~/ \~/ .

Total drinks: 12
[identity profile] kippurbird.livejournal.com
The List:

Take a drink every time:
* A name has a "cute" meaning.
* Someone does something idiotic.
* A character begins a rambling monologue.
* Two if the monologue is just repeating information we already have.
* One more every time he shows his own agenda when it comes to religion.
* Something happens, but you're not told what.
* He gets something utterly wrong.
* He turns a generalization into an absolute, but you can think of exceptions.
* The truth is precisely the opposite (make it a double).
* Any time a "secret agenda", "hidden agenda", or similar phrasing is mentioned
* The plot hinges on the exact wording of a translation of the original text.
* He mentions the Knights Templar, Masons or any other organization rumored to be the secret rulers of the world.
* A drink every time the words "secret" and "Vatican" are seen together
* Any time he gets all goddess/female power-happy.
* Any time that Langdon has an epiphany.
* And whenever a villain does something Stereotypically Evil (killing off his henchman who Knows Too Much, etc.).
* Any time Langdon has a flashback that shows How Totally Awesome his class is.
* Any time the novel becomes just plain boring
* Any time Brown appears to be writing one-handed.
* Any time that somebody comes up with an obviously cliche excuse and everyone buys it.
* Any time the villain angsts about Needing To Tell The Truth To All.
- Any time the hero does the same, make it a double.
- And a triple if they later decide NOT To Tell The Truth To All.

Glasses? \_/ check. Drink of the day? Rum. After all, it's Talk Like A Pirate day.

And we're back to Silas. Good old Silas who should be threatening our Heroes but instead completely destroys any tension because he's off doing his own thing. The police have been thwarted and no one is in any danger, except for me from liver poisoning. What's the point of having this threatening demon eyed villain if he's off doing other things besides harassing the heroes? Silas is off at the Church pretending to pray. He looks down at the ground and sees a brass line with graduated markings on it. He calls it the Rose Line.

It is not the Rose Line or Paris Meridian. "The meridian line on the floor of Saint-Sulpice is not a part of the Paris Meridian, which passes about 100 meters (yards) east of it. The line was instead installed in the 1700s as a gnomon or type of sundial." (Wikipedia) \~/

There's some info dump on the Rose Line and meridian which has absolutely no bearing on the story at all. Does it really matter that the Prime Meridian used to be in France and now is in Greenwich England? Do we need to know that Compass Rose has been used with maps and things? No. It's interesting (and maybe even true) but completely stalls the story. I want to know what the keystone is. I don't care about this other crap. Brown is trying to make the story feel all historical and full of information about all these interesting things, it kind of reminds me of Moby Dick with all those chapters about whales and whaling information and things that went on and on. I think Brown is trying to say, "Look this could be real! Look at all these real things I'm putting into it!" But this is the wrong sort of novel for that. This is a thriller novel, action packed mystery what is the code sort of novel. Not a dissertation on the history of... stuff. \~/

Silas gets up, he walks to the Obelisk and we cut to the priest on the plane that lands. So, that chapter was completely useless. All it did was talk about how wonderful the Rose Line was. That was dull. \~/

And we're back to Sophie. She's grousing about her grandfather keeping appalling secrets from her which is making her feel guilty because of all of the times he tried to reach out to her. She goes to get a black light and runs into Langdon. Robert wants to know if letters PS mean anything to her besides Princess Sophie. She has a flashback to when she was young and found a mysterious key necklace thing with the initials PS. Grandpa gets upset that she found the key and makes her promise never to tell anyone about it, in return she would get it when she was older.

Sophie tells Langdon about seeing the PS on something important to grandpa. Somehow Langdon knows that the PS (which keeps on reminding me of Piss) stands for the Priory of Scion. Because Leonardo Da Vinci was in it. Which is a secret society. \~/\~/. Sophie is amazed at this, especially when Robert starts rambling about the goddess mystique \~/ and thinks back to the fact that maybe that's what her grandfather was doing \~/. She tells him that he needs to leave, but he refuses to.

Meanwhile, Fache realized he's been duped. Oh dear. Too bad he didn't leave anyone at the museum to check up on what's happening there. Then he'd be able to catch Sophie and Langdon. Oh well.

Next chapter.

Silas gazed upward at the Saint-Sulpiec obelisk, taking in the length of the massive marble shaft. His sinews felt taut with exhilaration. He looked around the church one more time to make sure he was alone. Then he knelt at the base of the structure, not out of reverence but of necessity.


I think I'm going to leave with that.

Seven drinks.
[identity profile] kippurbird.livejournal.com
Drinking Game!

*Every time Edward sends a mixed message
*Every time Bella describes Edward,
*a drink for each adjective used
*Two drinks if it's really silly
*Bella is klutzy for no good reason
*Charlie shows no spine
*Bella's mom flails and/or gets panicky
*The truck's gas millage is mentioned.
*Someone does something that should make it obvious that they are some sort of supernatural creature?
*Somebody sparkles or "dazzles" someone?
*Anytime Edward does something stalkery.
*Anytime Bella realizes how wrong her behavior is but goes with it anyway?
*Anytime Bella's classmates fawn over her?
*Anytime Bella mentions what she had for breakfast/lunch/dinner/whatever
*Anytime Bella complains over things she shouldn't be complaining about
* Every time Bella mentions what class she went to
* Whenever Bella finds something extremely odd about Edward erotic?
** Doubles if it's something really weird, like the aforementioned stalking or his elbows or something.
* Every time Bella says she isn't worthy of Edward
* Every time Bella complains about the weather
* Every time Bella complains about Forks
*Bella thinks these people are totally below her
*the book contradicts itself
*something is introduced, and then not explained until much later, if at all
*Every time Bella is surprised by her own actions.
*Anytime there's proof that this is an alternate reality.



SHNOOKERED! )
[identity profile] kippurbird.livejournal.com
Well, we've gotten a good sample of the book so far so, I think it's time for our Drinking Game!

Take a Drink

*For an "As You Know Bob"
*It takes him over a page to name a character.
*There's a mention of rape
*There's a mention of the EVIL SORCERESSES who did something EVIL
*Tristan whines about having to become king
*Pilgrim acts like a dog
*Homoerotic subtext from Tristan
*Wigg with holds necessary information because they don't need to know it yet
*Someone sheds a single tear
*The Ancient Prophecy is mentioned
*The Chosen Ones are mentioned
*Newcomb does something stupid with his text/word choice

Any other suggestions?

Also I was looking at the Five Star Reviews on Amazon. Here's a few choice ones:

Truly unique fantasy book. Finally a fantasy work that is not a Tolkien/Arthurian re-hash. Has very thought provoking dominance/submission sexual undercurrents (prudes should look elsewhere)and a fresh take on magic. The author has a true understanding of man's eternal struggle to deal with real women and their usually domineering nature


*sniggers* Man's eternal struggle to deal with real women and their usually domineering nature. I think someone has issues with women. Perhaps mother issues? Most people seem to think it's the other way around.


One of the greatest books ever written. In terms of character Newcomb's done it, he has come up with one of the best character lines up ever in a single book. Men = Good Woman = Bad is an entirely new concept that works very well. The actual plot itself is vivid, he leaves no stone unturned and keesp you wanting more. Im no speed reader but this was a page turner, finished the whole thing (what, 700 ish pages?) in around 3 days.. considering I can read a clancy novel in 2 weeks thats amazingly fast. Great book, if you have even the slightest or smallest idea of getting this book, dont let the idiots who wrote bad reviews spoil an amazing adventure, BUY THIS BOOK!


Men = good, women = bad is a new concept? Riiiiiight.

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